Adverse Events, Comorbidities, and HIV

The Latest

This Week in HIV Research: One Step at a Time

June 13, 2019: Integrated stepped alcohol treatment in HIV clinics; cytokines, inflammation, and heart risk; impact of CCR5 gene editing on lifespan; the costs of "test and treat" for hepatitis C.

By Barbara Jungwirth and Myles Helfand

CDC Study Reinforces the Importance of Annual STI Testing Among MSM

Rectal and throat tests matter too, and providers should be recommending them.

By Sony Salzman

This Week in HIV Research: Matters of the Heart

May 30, 2019: Myocardial infarction risk among people with HIV; dolutegravir vs. efavirenz; a new way to estimate date of seroconversion; identifying people at imminent risk for disengagement from care.

By Barbara Jungwirth and Myles Helfand

FDA Approves First Throat and Rectal Tests for Detecting Chlamydia and Gonorrhea

These two tests make it easier to diagnose sexually transmitted infections that often go untreated.

By Stephen Hicks

This Week in HIV Research: I Screen, You Screen, We All Screen for HPV-Related Cancers

May 23, 2019: How CD4 variables over time affect anal cancer risk; when to consider anal pap smears for women; switching from E/C/F/TAF to ABC/3TC; new data on marijuana use among people with HIV.

By Barbara Jungwirth and Myles Helfand

Researchers Recommend Screening All People With HIV for Elevated Liver Function Values

Authors of a literature review note the high prevalence of liver disease among people with HIV and recommend a step-by-step approach to management.

By Barbara Jungwirth

This Week in HIV Research: A Test of Resistance

May 16, 2019: The dwindling value of baseline genotype testing; severe insomnia and cardiovascular disease; cardiovascular risk stratified by sex among people over 50; the persistence of racial disparities among women diagnosed with HIV.

By Barbara Jungwirth and Myles Helfand

Antiviral Stewardship Program Reduces Medication Errors at a Veterans Affairs Hospital

When people living with HIV are admitted to a hospital, they may not be able to bring their medications with them, and could be prescribed new medication by a doctor who doesn't understand their complete medical history.

By Sony Salzman

From Incarceration to Post-Release, Local Programs Improve Inmate Care for HIV and Hepatitis C

Two models, one from Washington State and another from Los Angeles County, can be duplicated elsewhere to get people into care, experts say.

By Stephen Hicks

This Week in HIV Research: Unexpected Outcomes

May 2, 2019: patient-centered care model improves viral suppression; subpar immune responses when baseline CD4 tops 500; when CD4 plummets despite viral suppression; vaccination, immunoglobulin, and hepatitis A exposure.

By Barbara Jungwirth and Myles Helfand