Warren Tong

Warren is the former senior science editor of TheBody.com and TheBodyPRO.com. He started out as an editorial intern in 2008.

He has been awarded journalist fellowships from the HIV Research for Prevention conference, and the Logan Science Journalism program.

He is a member of the Association of Health Care Journalists, the National Association of Science Writers, Science Writers in New York, and Asian American Journalists Association.

Warren is a native New Yorker, born in Manhattan and raised in Queens.

Follow Warren on Twitter: @WarrenAtTheBody.

Disclosures

Warren does not have any disclosures or conflicts of interest to report, as of June 20, 2017.

Categories Covered:HIV Treatment Strategies, FDA-Approved HIV Medications, Efavirenz (Sustiva, Stocrin), Abacavir (Ziagen), Stribild (Elvitegravir/Cobicistat/FTC/Tenofovir), Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate (Viread), Doravirine (Pifeltro), Etravirine (Intelence), Rilpivirine (Edurant), Ibalizumab (Trogarzo), Adverse Events, Comorbidities, and HIV, Cobicistat/Elvitegravir/Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate (Stribild), Cobicistat/Emtricitabine/Elvitegravir/Tenofovir Alafenamide (Genvoya, E/C/F/TAF), Providing Quality HIV Care, Legal Issues, HIV-Related Policy Issues, HIV Treatments in Development, Latinx People, PrEP (HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis), Pregnancy, Childbirth, and HIV, Gay Men, HIV Stigma and Discrimination, HIV Drugs In Development, HIV Treatment and Medical Care, HIV Policy and Advocacy, HIV Education and Risk Management, HIV Prevention Methods, HIV Epidemiology, First-Line HIV Treatment, HIV Care and Services Outside the US, Managing People Newly Diagnosed With HIV, HIV Care Continuum, Dolutegravir (Tivicay), Physical Health Issues, Mental Health, Women, Curing HIV, African-Americans, Managing HIV Drug Resistance, HIV Testing, HIV Prevention and Transmission, Switching or Stopping HIV Treatment, U=U (Undetectable Equals Untransmittable, i.e. HIV Treatment as Prevention), HIV Testing, HIV in Arts and Entertainment, HIV in Film, TV, and Media, Cancer and HIV, Starting HIV Treatment and Medical Care, Managing Long-Term HIV Survivors, HIV Case Management and Social Work, HIV Advocates in the Spotlight, HIV/AIDS Outside the U.S., HIV in Specific Countries, Meeting the Costs of HIV Care, Emtricitabine/Rilpivirine/Tenofovir Alafenamide (Odefsey), Emtricitabine (FTC, Emtriva), HIV Advocacy and Activism, History of HIV/AIDS, Primary Care of People With HIV, HIV Basic Science and Pathogenesis, People Under 30, Newly Diagnosed, Myths About HIV/AIDS, Vaccines and Microbicides for HIV, Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Alafenamide (Descovy), Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate (Truvada), Non-HIV Sexually Transmitted Infections, Liver Issues and HIV, Lopinavir/Ritonavir (Kaletra), Lamivudine (3TC, Epivir), Cobicistat/Darunavir (Prezcobix), HIV, Discrimination, and Law, Understanding HIV-Related Lab Tests, Regional/Global Anti-HIV Efforts, Bictegravir/Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Alafenamide (Biktarvy, B/F/TAF), Atazanavir/Cobicistat (Evotaz), Finding HIV Support Groups and Services, PrEP (HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis), Nutrition and Fitness, Pediatric HIV Care, Managing Primary/Acute HIV Infection, Living Well With HIV, Bone Problems and HIV, Flu (Influenza), Colds, and HIV, Switching or Stopping HIV Treatment, HIV in the Arts, People Over 50, PEP (HIV Post-Exposure Prophylaxis), Disclosing Your HIV Status, HIV and Mental Health Care

Latest by Warren Tong

The Only Cases of HIV Cure or Remission

Over the past few years, a tiny – but slowly growing – number of people appeared to have had active, living, reproducing HIV completely eliminated from their bodies.

By Warren Tong and Myles Helfand

This Week in HIV Research: Increased Muscle Area After Starting Treatment Likely Due to Fat Accumulation

This week, a study finds that increased muscle area after starting HIV treatment may be due to fat accumulation within the muscle rather than new muscle formation.

By Warren Tong and Barbara Jungwirth

This Week in HIV Research: Abstinence-Only Programs Censor HIV Prevention

This week, a study finds that abstinence-only programs continue to be ineffective at keeping young people from having sex, and censor valuable information on HIV prevention.

By Warren Tong and Barbara Jungwirth

This Week in HIV Research: Average Time Between Diagnosis and Linkage to Care

This week, a study finds that the average time it takes to for newly diagnosed patients to enter care is three months.

By Warren Tong and Barbara Jungwirth

This Week in HIV Research: Viral Suppression Without Treatment in Monkeys

This week, a study review finds that early interventions in monkeys, such as broadly neutralizing antibodies, can help lead to viral suppression without treatment.

By Warren Tong and Barbara Jungwirth

This Week in HIV Research: Injectable PrEP Shows Promise in New Study

This week, a study finds that injectable cabotegravir, an investigational integrase inhibitor, is well tolerated and shows promise as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

By Warren Tong and Barbara Jungwirth

This Week in HIV Research: Effect of Viral Load Perception on Sex, and HIV Prevention Options Needed in U.S. Prisons

This week, a study finds that viral load perception may change sexual behaviors among HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

By Warren Tong and Barbara Jungwirth

This Week in HIV Research: New Discovery in How HIV Hijacks a Cell

This week, a study finds a new key step in how HIV binds to CD4 cells, which could lead to the development of new HIV drugs.

By Warren Tong and Barbara Jungwirth

What Needs to Happen for PrEP to Reach All Who Need It?

PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) is highly effective at preventing HIV, but uptake has been slow around the world. We asked providers and community leaders what they thought needed to happen for PrEP to reach everybody who needs it.

By Warren Tong

This Week in HIV Research: Early Treatment With Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies Suppresses SHIV in Monkeys

This week, a study finds that administering two broadly neutralizing antibodies very early on during infection helped monkeys achieve long-term viral suppression of simian HIV (SHIV).

By Warren Tong and Barbara Jungwirth