The Center for AIDS Information & Advocacy

The CFA advocates both locally and nationally for better treatments and better access to care for persons living with HIV/AIDS and strives to keep the Houston medical and affected community informed, updated, and involved in the search for a cure. The CFA also publishes Research Initiative/Treatment Action! (RI_TA!_). This quarterly journal provides the latest HIV/AIDS information to the medical and HIV communities.

About RI_TA!_

Research Initiative/Treatment Action (RI_TA!) is a publication of The Center for AIDS (CFA). RI_TA! covers issues in HIV research and policy, and is intended for the HIV medical, research, and professional communities. The statements and opinions expressed herein do not imply recommendations or endorsement. Always consult your doctor before altering a prescribed drug regimen or taking any drug or supplement.

RI_TA!_ is available in print or online, and is currently produced four times a year. The printed publication is free of charge for people with HIV/AIDS, the agencies that serve the HIV/AIDS infected and affected population, and research and educational institutions. It is available in print at The CFA information center and by mail.

RI_TA!_ is distributed widely in the U.S. and sent to more than a dozen countries. The publication is indexed by the National Library of Medicine in PubMed and is included in several other free and commercial databases.

Letters to the editor, pertaining to material published in RI_TA!_, are encouraged and may be sent to rita@centerforaids.org. Letters will be published at the editor's discretion, and may be modified or edited as deemed necessary or appropriate.

If you would like RI_TA!_ sent to you or your organization, please contact The CFA with your full mailing address. Bulk mailings are not available for RI_TA!_ (single copies only) unless the recipient pays for shipping and handling (contact The CFA for details). Although the publication is free, donations are always appreciated to help with publication and shipping costs.

How to Reach the Center for AIDS

P.O. Box 66306
Houston, TX 77266-6306

1407 Hawthorne
Houston, TX 77006

Toll Free: 888.341.1788
Phone: 713.527.8219
Fax: 713.521.3679
Web: www.centerforaids.org

Categories Covered:Primary Care of People With HIV, HIV Testing, Managing People Newly Diagnosed With HIV, HIV Care Continuum, Adverse Events, Comorbidities, and HIV, Providing Quality HIV Care, Managing Long-Term HIV Survivors, HIV Basic Science and Pathogenesis, HIV Prevention Methods, HIV Epidemiology, HIV Policy and Advocacy, HIV Treatments in Development, Pregnancy, Childbirth, and HIV, Pediatric HIV Care, HIV Case Management and Social Work, HIV and Mental Health Care, Switching or Stopping HIV Treatment, Meeting the Costs of HIV Care, HIV Education and Risk Management, HIV Treatment Strategies, HIV Care and Services Outside the US, Abacavir (Ziagen), Managing HIV Drug Resistance, PrEP (HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis), Managing Primary/Acute HIV Infection, U=U (Undetectable Equals Untransmittable, i.e. HIV Treatment as Prevention), FDA-Approved HIV Medications, Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate (Truvada)

Latest by The Center for AIDS Information & Advocacy

Alcohol and HIV: When to Screen, What to Say, How to Treat

An interview with Jeffrey Samet, M.D., M.A., M.P.H., an international authority on addiction medicine with a special interest in addictions among people with HIV infection.

By Mark Mascolini for The Center for AIDS Information & Advocacy

Big 3 Lung Cancer Risk Factors With HIV: Smoking, Low CD4s, Lung Infection

Smoking so dominates the lung cancer risk list that other factors struggle for a small slice of the spotlight.

By Mark Mascolini for The Center for AIDS Information & Advocacy

Lung Cancer Risk and Screening With HIV -- and an Intriguing New Treatment Opportunity

Highly regarded for his contributions to cancer research in people with HIV, Keith M. Sigel, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., has led numerous innovative studies on these conditions and others in people with HIV.

By Mark Mascolini for The Center for AIDS Information & Advocacy

Sorting Adherence Risk Factors to Shape Better Adherence Care

Potential reasons for poor antiretroviral adherence -- and for good adherence -- seem limited only by the imagination of adherence researchers.

By Mark Mascolini for The Center for AIDS Information & Advocacy

Correcting Mistakes and Misperceptions in Managing Antiretroviral Adherence

"There's a substantial patient population that continues to struggle with adherence," says Seth Kalichman, Ph.D., "and we have to target this select group for added support."

By Mark Mascolini for The Center for AIDS Information & Advocacy

Fat Gains Continue and Lean Mass Falls in Group on Long-Term HIV Therapy

Researchers working with the U.S. AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) conducted a study to learn more about multi-year body composition changes in HIV-positive people taking antiretroviral therapy.

By Mark Mascolini for The Center for AIDS Information & Advocacy

Weight Gain Poses Higher Diabetes Risk With HIV in U.S. Veterans Study

Researchers working with a U.S. veterans group conducted a study to see how weight gain affects diabetes risk in veterans with and without HIV infection.

By Mark Mascolini for The Center for AIDS Information & Advocacy

Main Barriers to Antiretroviral Pill Taking in Adults, Adolescents and Children

Simply forgetting to take antiretroviral pills, being away from home and a change in the daily routine headed the list of reasons for inconsistent antiretroviral pill taking in a 125-study analysis.

By Mark Mascolini for The Center for AIDS Information & Advocacy

Heavy and Binge Alcohol Drinking Tied to Missing HIV Care Appointments

Heavy alcohol drinking lowered chances of keeping HIV care appointments more than 20%, according to results of a 9694-person U.S. study.

By Mark Mascolini for The Center for AIDS Information & Advocacy

Pneumococcal Disease 13 Times More Frequent in People With HIV

Compared with HIV-negative people, people with HIV had a 13 times higher rate of invasive pneumococcal disease, a possibly serious infection with the bacterium Streptococcus pneumonia (Strep)

By Mark Mascolini for The Center for AIDS Information & Advocacy