Latest by John S. James

Not Your Everyday Antiretroviral: KP-1461, an HIV DNA Killer

Summary: KP-1461, an experimental HIV drug already in a phase II trial, works so differently from other antiretrovirals that at first glance it looked like science fiction, and we found it hard to take seriously as a current possibility today. In fac...

By John S. James for AIDS Treatment News

Radio Frequency Identification Tracking May Help Prevent Drug Counterfeiting

The FDA has asked the pharmaceutical industry for help in testing technology to track drugs electronically through the supply chain to prevent drug counterfeiting -- a huge worldwide problem that mushroomed in the U.S. several years ago, centered esp...

By John S. James for AIDS Treatment News

Medicare Prescription Nightmare: Overview of Problems Affecting HIV-Positive People

Many thousands of people could not continue filling even their current prescriptions after the new Medicare Part D (prescription drug coverage) started January 1, 2006. Many thousands are wrongly being told to pay hundreds of dollars, when they are o...

By John S. James for AIDS Treatment News

Medical Innovation and Patent Gridlock

Today's pharmaceutical research and development has two huge problems, one widely recognized and the other often missed.

1. New-Drug Prices

Under the current system most of the world's people will have no access to new, patented drugs for up to 20...

By John S. James for AIDS Treatment News

Tipranavir (Aptivus): Approval Cautiously Recommended

Tipranavir (brand name Aptivus), a protease inhibitor that usually works against HIV that is resistant to other protease inhibitors, was recommended for approval by the FDA's Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee at a meeting on May 19, 2005. The drug, ...

By John S. James for AIDS Treatment News

Tat Inhibitors, a New Approach: Interview With Olaf Kutsch, Ph.D.

Years ago Hoffmann-LaRoche (now Roche) developed an experimental drug that blocked the HIV protein Tat in laboratory tests. But it did not work against HIV in patients, for reasons that were then unknown. Though scientists considered this kind of ant...

By John S. James for AIDS Treatment News

Nevirapine Misinformation: Will It Kill?

Summary: In mid December 2004 three Associated Press stories created widespread doubts about nevirapine, a well-known, critically important drug that can prevent HIV in many of the 1,800 babies now infected every day by their mothers in childbirth. T...

By John S. James for AIDS Treatment News

Behind the December 2004 "AIDS Breakthrough" Headlines

Press stories in mid December 2004 about an AIDS breakthrough from Rutgers University and elsewhere were exaggerated in the media, but the treatment development is real and important. It concerns a family of experimental antiretrovirals called DAPYs,...

By John S. James for AIDS Treatment News

Sculptra (Formerly New Fill) for Facial Wasting -- Where to Find Information on the Patient-Assistance Program

SculptraTM (marketed in some countries as New FillTM) was approved in August 2004 by the FDA "for restoration and/or correction of the signs of facial fat loss (lipoatrophy) in people with human immunodeficiency virus." It was approved narrowly for t...

By John S. James for AIDS Treatment News

India Changes Patent Law to Meet WTO Treaty, Making New Medicines Less Available to Most Citizens, Other Countries

By presidential decree India changed its patent law in December 2004 to meet a January 2005 deadline to allow patents on the chemical molecules used in drugs -- not only for new drugs starting in 2005 but also for many others that were patentable aft...

By John S. James for AIDS Treatment News