https://www.thebodypro.com/article/smokings-pernicious-impact-worse-with-hiv-infectio
    Death Rate Over 4 Years in HIV-Positive Smokers vs. Nonsmokers
    Death Rate Over 4 Years in HIV-Positive Smokers vs. Nonsmokers Figure 1. A 17,995-person analysis of HIV-positive people in Europe and the United States determined that smokers had almost a twice higher death rate than nonsmokers through 4 years of follow-up.5 In a separate analysis of current smokers, former smokers, and never smokers, current smokers had a nearly twice higher death rate than never smokers. But the death rate was similar in former smokers and people who never smoked.
    MIs Prevented by Never Smoking or Quitting Smoking
    MIs Prevented by Never Smoking or Quitting Smoking Figure 2. If no HIV-positive people ever smoked, 72% of myocardial infarctions would be prevented in people with HIV, according to results of a nationwide Danish study.3 If all current HIV-positive smokers quit, 42% of MIs would be prevented. Proportions of preventable MIs would be much lower in a comparison group of HIV-negative people.
    Rates of MI, CHD and CVD After Smoking Stops
    Rates of MI, CHD and CVD After Smoking Stops Figure 3. In the 3 or more years after DAD study members stopped smoking, rates of myocardial infarction (MI), coronary heart disease (CHD), and cardiovascular disease (CVD) (defined in text) declined steadily when compared with study members who never smoked.32 (Incidence rate ratios calculated per 100 person-years.)
    Factors Tied to Higher Smoking Rate in People With HIV
    Factors Tied to Higher Smoking Rate in People With HIV Figure 4. In a nationally representative sample of people in care for HIV infection, factors independently associated with higher adjusted smoking prevalence included age 40 to 49 or age 50+ (versus 18 to 29), non-Hispanic white or black race (versus Hispanic), and less than a high school education or a high school education (versus more than high school).51 Figure 5 charts seven other independent predictors.
    Factors Tied to Higher Smoking Rate in People With HIV
    Factors Tied to Higher Smoking Rate in People With HIV Figure 5. A CDC study of a nationally representative sample of HIV-positive people in care identified several factors independently associated with higher adjusted smoking prevalence, including viral load (VL) not at or below 200 copies/mL and the other variables shown here and in Figure 4.51

    Mark Mascolini

    Mark Mascolini writes about HIV infection.

    The Center for AIDS Information & Advocacy

    The Center for AIDS Information & Advocacy