What Is the State of the Art in HIV Treatment and Prevention?

What Is the State of the Art in HIV Treatment and Prevention?

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With eight new HIV drugs approved so far in 2018, it's been a busy year in the world of HIV clinical research. Now, with several new regimens nearing late-stage trials, a new generation of HIV antiretrovirals may soon be entering the marketplace.

Thankfully, three researchers presenting at IDWeek 2018 in San Francisco summarized the latest clinical research for a packed audience of infectious disease specialists. Susan P. Buchbinder, M.D., of the San Francisco Department of Health, summed up current research on long-acting antiretroviral candidates for treatment and prevention.

"Over the next four to five years were going to have several other potential agents entering the field," said Buchbinder. "The future is bright; there are lots of possibilities."

As well, Judith Currier, M.D., with the UCLA Division of Infectious Diseases shared the latest research on novel drug candidates that might improve the standard of care for patients with highly drug resistant infections. Finally, cardiologist Priscilla Hsue, M.D., with UCSF shared new research on the link between inflammation and HIV, and she offered tips on what HIV physicians can do to help their patients limit inflammation.

Sony Salzman is a freelance journalist reporting on health care and medicine, who has won awards in both narrative writing and radio journalism. Follow Salzman on Twitter: @sonysalz.

Image Credit: Ralwel for iStock via Thinkstock

With eight new HIV drugs approved so far in 2018, it's been a busy year in the world of HIV clinical research. Now, with several new regimens nearing late-stage trials, a new generation of HIV antiretrovirals may soon be entering the marketplace.

Thankfully, three researchers presenting at IDWeek 2018 in San Francisco summarized the latest clinical research for a packed audience of infectious disease specialists. Susan P. Buchbinder, M.D., of the San Francisco Department of Health, summed up current research on long-acting antiretroviral candidates for treatment and prevention.

"Over the next four to five years were going to have several other potential agents entering the field," said Buchbinder. "The future is bright; there are lots of possibilities."

As well, Judith Currier, M.D., with the UCLA Division of Infectious Diseases shared the latest research on novel drug candidates that might improve the standard of care for patients with highly drug resistant infections. Finally, cardiologist Priscilla Hsue, M.D., with UCSF shared new research on the link between inflammation and HIV, and she offered tips on what HIV physicians can do to help their patients limit inflammation.

Sony Salzman is a freelance journalist reporting on health care and medicine, who has won awards in both narrative writing and radio journalism. Follow Salzman on Twitter: @sonysalz.

Image Credit: Ralwel for iStock via Thinkstock