What Encourages Black and Latinx Trans Women to Take PrEP?

What Encourages Black and Latinx Trans Women to Take PrEP?

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It has been a challenge to encourage transgender women of color to take and adhere over time to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). And, while HIV prevention is a priority -- especially since trans women are the most vulnerable to HIV infection -- this demographic is juggling a myriad of other issues, including gender transitioning, housing and employment security, and general safety.

But not all is lost. There are factors that can increase black and Latinx trans women's willingness to pop this little blue pill every day. At CROI 2018, Tonia Poteat, Ph.D., assistant professor of public health with John's Hopkins University, presented research on "Predictors of Willingness to Take PrEP Among Black and Latina Trans Women" to show what can work to increase PrEP uptake among this population, determine possibilities for successful interventions, and ask questions for future research.

Image Credit: Tonia Poteat, Ph.D., courtesy of the Johns Hopkins University Center for Public Health and Human Rights

It has been a challenge to encourage transgender women of color to take and adhere over time to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). And, while HIV prevention is a priority -- especially since trans women are the most vulnerable to HIV infection -- this demographic is juggling a myriad of other issues, including gender transitioning, housing and employment security, and general safety.

But not all is lost. There are factors that can increase black and Latinx trans women's willingness to pop this little blue pill every day. At CROI 2018, Tonia Poteat, Ph.D., assistant professor of public health with John's Hopkins University, presented research on "Predictors of Willingness to Take PrEP Among Black and Latina Trans Women" to show what can work to increase PrEP uptake among this population, determine possibilities for successful interventions, and ask questions for future research.

Image Credit: Tonia Poteat, Ph.D., courtesy of the Johns Hopkins University Center for Public Health and Human Rights