What Are the Factors That Make Women in the U.S. South Eligible for PrEP?

What Are the Factors That Make Women in the U.S. South Eligible for PrEP?

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Women of Color in the South and PrEP Use

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a successful tool proven to prevent the transmission of HIV in those who take it daily. And while white men who have sex with men (MSM) have been reaping the benefits of this biomedical prevention, some of the people most in need of PrEP, including women living in the South, are not.

So what needs to be done to ensure that the women most vulnerable to HIV are being identified and made more knowledgeable about PrEP? And what are the demographic, sociobehavioral and clinical factors that made women the most likely candidates for PrEP?

At the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) 2018, Anar Patel, M.D., a research fellow with Emory University, presented "Expanding PrEP In Women" to help answer these questions and identify a few solutions.

Kellee Terrell is the former news editor for TheBody.com and TheBodyPRO.com. Her work has appeared in the Huffington Post, Essence, Ebony, The Advocate, POZ and the Black AIDS Institute, to name a few. Follow her on Twitter @kelleent.

Image Credit: AIDSinfo

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a successful tool proven to prevent the transmission of HIV in those who take it daily. And while white men who have sex with men (MSM) have been reaping the benefits of this biomedical prevention, some of the people most in need of PrEP, including women living in the South, are not.

So what needs to be done to ensure that the women most vulnerable to HIV are being identified and made more knowledgeable about PrEP? And what are the demographic, sociobehavioral and clinical factors that made women the most likely candidates for PrEP?

At the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) 2018, Anar Patel, M.D., a research fellow with Emory University, presented "Expanding PrEP In Women" to help answer these questions and identify a few solutions.

Kellee Terrell is the former news editor for TheBody.com and TheBodyPRO.com. Her work has appeared in the Huffington Post, Essence, Ebony, The Advocate, POZ and the Black AIDS Institute, to name a few. Follow her on Twitter @kelleent.

Image Credit: AIDSinfo