This Week in HIV Research: This Is Your Brain on Stigma

This Week in HIV Research: This Is Your Brain on Stigma

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Even studies that yield unsurprising overarching results can sometimes contain individual findings that are unusual or thought-provoking. So it is with some of our featured studies in this week's exploration of recently published HIV-related research. This week, we learn that:

  • HIV-related stigma may have a direct impact not only on anxiety levels, but also cognitive performance.
  • Trauma history and social factors may help explain higher HIV rates among young black men who have sex with men (MSM) despite other risk-reducing behaviors.
  • Receiving fewer than 12 weeks of HIV treatment in pregnancy may correlate with a greater risk of falling out of the care continuum afterward.
  • Raltegravir (Isentress) passes muster as a pediatric treatment option, but with an important caveat.

Join us for a closer look at each of these studies -- and a few of their intriguing data points. To beat HIV, you have to follow the science!

Barbara Jungwirth is a freelance writer and translator based in New York. Follow Barbara on Twitter: @reliabletran.

Myles Helfand is the executive editor and general manager of TheBody and TheBodyPRO. Follow Myles on Twitter: @MylesatTheBody.

Image Credit: utah778 for iStock via Thinkstock

Even studies that yield unsurprising overarching results can sometimes contain individual findings that are unusual or thought-provoking. So it is with some of our featured studies in this week's exploration of recently published HIV-related research. This week, we learn that:

  • HIV-related stigma may have a direct impact not only on anxiety levels, but also cognitive performance.
  • Trauma history and social factors may help explain higher HIV rates among young black men who have sex with men (MSM) despite other risk-reducing behaviors.
  • Receiving fewer than 12 weeks of HIV treatment in pregnancy may correlate with a greater risk of falling out of the care continuum afterward.
  • Raltegravir (Isentress) passes muster as a pediatric treatment option, but with an important caveat.

Join us for a closer look at each of these studies -- and a few of their intriguing data points. To beat HIV, you have to follow the science!

Barbara Jungwirth is a freelance writer and translator based in New York. Follow Barbara on Twitter: @reliabletran.

Myles Helfand is the executive editor and general manager of TheBody and TheBodyPRO. Follow Myles on Twitter: @MylesatTheBody.

Image Credit: utah778 for iStock via Thinkstock