This Week in HIV Research: The Science of Risk

This Week in HIV Research: The Science of Risk

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Thanks for joining us for another brief exploration of notable recently published research with relevance to the HIV care community. This week's highlighted studies are all about risk factors for complications among people living with HIV: Which factors we're paying too much attention to, which factors we should be paying more attention to, and which factors we're still not altogether certain about.

Specifically, this week we learn:

  • Our clinical eye should be cast more closely on traditional factors than HIV-specific factors when gauging a person's risk of developing non-communicable complications.
  • Frailty appears to be a particularly reliable indicator of future fracture risk among women with HIV.
  • We need to be careful about the extent to which we lean exclusively on traditional lipid measurements when gauging coronary risks among people with HIV.
  • New data extend the debate over the extent to which efavirenz (Sustiva, Stocrin) use during pregnancy is associated with birth defects.

Come along as we glance more deeply at each of these findings. To beat HIV, you have to follow the science!

Barbara Jungwirth is a freelance writer and translator based in New York. Follow Barbara on Twitter: @reliabletran.
Myles Helfand is the executive editor and general manager of TheBody and TheBodyPRO. Follow Myles on Twitter: @MylesatTheBody.

Image Credit: bizoo_n via iStock

Thanks for joining us for another brief exploration of notable recently published research with relevance to the HIV care community. This week's highlighted studies are all about risk factors for complications among people living with HIV: Which factors we're paying too much attention to, which factors we should be paying more attention to, and which factors we're still not altogether certain about.

Specifically, this week we learn:

  • Our clinical eye should be cast more closely on traditional factors than HIV-specific factors when gauging a person's risk of developing non-communicable complications.
  • Frailty appears to be a particularly reliable indicator of future fracture risk among women with HIV.
  • We need to be careful about the extent to which we lean exclusively on traditional lipid measurements when gauging coronary risks among people with HIV.
  • New data extend the debate over the extent to which efavirenz (Sustiva, Stocrin) use during pregnancy is associated with birth defects.

Come along as we glance more deeply at each of these findings. To beat HIV, you have to follow the science!

Barbara Jungwirth is a freelance writer and translator based in New York. Follow Barbara on Twitter: @reliabletran.
Myles Helfand is the executive editor and general manager of TheBody and TheBodyPRO. Follow Myles on Twitter: @MylesatTheBody.

Image Credit: bizoo_n via iStock