This Week in HIV Research: The Power of 10,000 Steps

This Week in HIV Research: The Power of 10,000 Steps

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We've strapped on our electronic boots for another trek through the vast, untamed wilderness of peer-reviewed journals. This week, our hike turned up several noteworthy HIV-focused manuscripts, including the following findings of potential clinical relevance:

  • Sedentary people living with HIV have exceptionally low cardiorespiratory fitness, exacerbating inflammation risk -- but a little walking can help.
  • There are plenty of barriers to greater physical activity for people living with HIV -- but also plenty of strategies an HIV care provider can employ to help their patients improve.
  • Although transwomen with HIV aren't at greater risk for metabolic syndrome than cisgender men with HIV, certain metabolic factors may nonetheless be increasing their cardiovascular risk.
  • Failed treatment of precancerous cervical lesions -- as well as lesion recurrence -- occurs more frequently among women living with HIV than their HIV-negative counterparts.

March on ahead with us for more information on each of these study findings. To beat HIV, you have to follow the science!

Barbara Jungwirth is a freelance writer and translator based in New York. Follow Barbara on Twitter: @reliabletran.

Myles Helfand is the executive editor and general manager of TheBody and TheBodyPRO. Follow Myles on Twitter: @MylesatTheBody.

We've strapped on our electronic boots for another trek through the vast, untamed wilderness of peer-reviewed journals. This week, our hike turned up several noteworthy HIV-focused manuscripts, including the following findings of potential clinical relevance:

  • Sedentary people living with HIV have exceptionally low cardiorespiratory fitness, exacerbating inflammation risk -- but a little walking can help.
  • There are plenty of barriers to greater physical activity for people living with HIV -- but also plenty of strategies an HIV care provider can employ to help their patients improve.
  • Although transwomen with HIV aren't at greater risk for metabolic syndrome than cisgender men with HIV, certain metabolic factors may nonetheless be increasing their cardiovascular risk.
  • Failed treatment of precancerous cervical lesions -- as well as lesion recurrence -- occurs more frequently among women living with HIV than their HIV-negative counterparts.

March on ahead with us for more information on each of these study findings. To beat HIV, you have to follow the science!

Barbara Jungwirth is a freelance writer and translator based in New York. Follow Barbara on Twitter: @reliabletran.

Myles Helfand is the executive editor and general manager of TheBody and TheBodyPRO. Follow Myles on Twitter: @MylesatTheBody.