This Week in HIV Research: The Case for Pre-Pregnancy Treatment

This Week in HIV Research: The Case for Pre-Pregnancy Treatment

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Thanks for tuning in for our latest examination of recently published research that's noteworthy in the HIV universe. This week's slate of four studies highlights the following findings:

  • The benefits of pre-pregnancy HIV treatment initiation for mothers-to-be may include greater protection for the infant from hospitalizations due to non-HIV infections.
  • HIV diagnoses continue to rise relentlessly among young men who have sex with men (MSM) in the U.S., with MSM of color still bearing a disproportionate burden.
  • It may not only be clinically wise for many women in heterosexual serodiscordant couples to take pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP); it may also be more cost-effective for health care systems.
  • While reducing long-term cardiovascular risk is a worthwhile goal in people living with HIV, low doses of the immunosuppressant methotrexate might not be the best tool for getting there.

Read onward for our brief recaps of each of these new study results. To beat HIV, you have to follow the science!

Barbara Jungwirth is a freelance writer and translator based in New York. Follow Barbara on Twitter: @reliabletran.

Myles Helfand is the executive editor and general manager of TheBody and TheBodyPRO. Follow Myles on Twitter: @MylesatTheBody.

Image Credit: Askold Romanov for iStock via Thinkstock

Thanks for tuning in for our latest examination of recently published research that's noteworthy in the HIV universe. This week's slate of four studies highlights the following findings:

  • The benefits of pre-pregnancy HIV treatment initiation for mothers-to-be may include greater protection for the infant from hospitalizations due to non-HIV infections.
  • HIV diagnoses continue to rise relentlessly among young men who have sex with men (MSM) in the U.S., with MSM of color still bearing a disproportionate burden.
  • It may not only be clinically wise for many women in heterosexual serodiscordant couples to take pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP); it may also be more cost-effective for health care systems.
  • While reducing long-term cardiovascular risk is a worthwhile goal in people living with HIV, low doses of the immunosuppressant methotrexate might not be the best tool for getting there.

Read onward for our brief recaps of each of these new study results. To beat HIV, you have to follow the science!

Barbara Jungwirth is a freelance writer and translator based in New York. Follow Barbara on Twitter: @reliabletran.

Myles Helfand is the executive editor and general manager of TheBody and TheBodyPRO. Follow Myles on Twitter: @MylesatTheBody.

Image Credit: Askold Romanov for iStock via Thinkstock