This Week in HIV Research: Stroke Risk in Less-Studied Populations

This Week in HIV Research: Stroke Risk in Less-Studied Populations

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Higher Risk of Stroke for Women and African Americans Living With HIV

Among people living with HIV (PLWH), women and African Americans are at greater risk of stroke than men and people of other races, an observational cohort study published in AIDS showed.

Researchers analyzed data on 6,933 PLWH, 20% of whom were women and 37% African American. None had been on antiretroviral therapy before participating in the parent study. Fifty-four strokes or transient ischemic attacks (TIA) occurred during the multi-year study's 32,023 person-years (PY). Women's stroke/TIA incidence (2.88 per 1,000 PY) was more than double that of men (1.40 per 1,000 PY), and African Americans suffered more strokes/TIAs (2.51 per 1,000 PY) than whites (1.56 per 1,000 PY).

Historically, women and people of color have been underrepresented in HIV research. "Special attention should be paid to these at-risk populations as we design and implement studies focused on understanding and reducing elevated stroke risk in HIV infection," study authors concluded. They also called for greater efforts in targeting risk factors, as well as retaining people in HIV care, to reduce stroke incidence in PLWH.

Among people living with HIV (PLWH), women and African Americans are at greater risk of stroke than men and people of other races, an observational cohort study published in AIDS showed.

Researchers analyzed data on 6,933 PLWH, 20% of whom were women and 37% African American. None had been on antiretroviral therapy before participating in the parent study. Fifty-four strokes or transient ischemic attacks (TIA) occurred during the multi-year study's 32,023 person-years (PY). Women's stroke/TIA incidence (2.88 per 1,000 PY) was more than double that of men (1.40 per 1,000 PY), and African Americans suffered more strokes/TIAs (2.51 per 1,000 PY) than whites (1.56 per 1,000 PY).

Historically, women and people of color have been underrepresented in HIV research. "Special attention should be paid to these at-risk populations as we design and implement studies focused on understanding and reducing elevated stroke risk in HIV infection," study authors concluded. They also called for greater efforts in targeting risk factors, as well as retaining people in HIV care, to reduce stroke incidence in PLWH.