This Week in HIV Research: Additional Nuance on Pregnancy and Antiretrovirals

This Week in HIV Research: Additional Nuance on Pregnancy and Antiretrovirals

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Major landmark studies with fundamental, field-changing ramifications tend to grab the most headlines. But one of the things we love about This Week in HIV Research is that we can often cede the stage to studies that further our ability to provide effective HIV care and services in comparatively small but nonetheless important ways.
For instance, our highlighted research this week suggests that:

  • There's no harm in switching HIV treatment regimens during the first trimester of pregnancy out of concern for drug safety.
  • Fears are unfounded that pre-existing drug resistance is the primary driver of elevated viral load during pregnancy in South Africa.
  • Successful hepatitis C treatment using direct-acting antivirals renders HIV status irrelevant to future liver complication risk.
  • Hepatic steatosis is a concern among young people who have been living with HIV since infancy.

Let's take a moment to learn a bit more about each of these recently published findings. To beat HIV, you have to follow the science!

Barbara Jungwirth is a freelance writer and translator based in New York. Follow Barbara on Twitter: @reliabletran.

Myles Helfand is the executive editor and general manager of TheBody and TheBodyPRO. Follow Myles on Twitter: @MylesatTheBody.

Major landmark studies with fundamental, field-changing ramifications tend to grab the most headlines. But one of the things we love about This Week in HIV Research is that we can often cede the stage to studies that further our ability to provide effective HIV care and services in comparatively small but nonetheless important ways.
For instance, our highlighted research this week suggests that:

  • There's no harm in switching HIV treatment regimens during the first trimester of pregnancy out of concern for drug safety.
  • Fears are unfounded that pre-existing drug resistance is the primary driver of elevated viral load during pregnancy in South Africa.
  • Successful hepatitis C treatment using direct-acting antivirals renders HIV status irrelevant to future liver complication risk.
  • Hepatic steatosis is a concern among young people who have been living with HIV since infancy.

Let's take a moment to learn a bit more about each of these recently published findings. To beat HIV, you have to follow the science!

Barbara Jungwirth is a freelance writer and translator based in New York. Follow Barbara on Twitter: @reliabletran.

Myles Helfand is the executive editor and general manager of TheBody and TheBodyPRO. Follow Myles on Twitter: @MylesatTheBody.