This Week in HIV Research: Mitigating an ICE-y Reception

This Week in HIV Research: Mitigating an ICE-y Reception

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As the summer continues to heat up in much of the Northern Hemisphere, the fires of HIV research keep on burning. Here are a few stories we recently spotted heating up the journal scene:

  • The anti-immigration push that's grabbed so many headlines in the U.S. this year may have ramifications for Latinx people with HIV -- but health care providers can help improve the situation.
  • Even when plasma is devoid of HIV, a person’s rectal tissue may not be, a small study notes.
  • Hepatitis C (HCV) treatment initiation is a boon for HIV/HCV-coinfected patients regardless of their fibrosis stage, a Canadian study finds.
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination significantly reduces HPV persistence among women living with HIV, research suggests.

As the old saying goes: If you can't stand the heat, keep on reading this article. And, of course, to beat HIV, you have to follow the science!

Barbara Jungwirth is a freelance writer and translator based in New York. Follow Barbara on Twitter: @reliabletran.

Myles Helfand is the executive editor and general manager of TheBody.com and TheBodyPRO.com. Follow Myles on Twitter: @MylesatTheBody.

Image Credit: U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (Public domain), via Wikimedia Commons

As the summer continues to heat up in much of the Northern Hemisphere, the fires of HIV research keep on burning. Here are a few stories we recently spotted heating up the journal scene:

  • The anti-immigration push that's grabbed so many headlines in the U.S. this year may have ramifications for Latinx people with HIV -- but health care providers can help improve the situation.
  • Even when plasma is devoid of HIV, a person’s rectal tissue may not be, a small study notes.
  • Hepatitis C (HCV) treatment initiation is a boon for HIV/HCV-coinfected patients regardless of their fibrosis stage, a Canadian study finds.
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination significantly reduces HPV persistence among women living with HIV, research suggests.

As the old saying goes: If you can't stand the heat, keep on reading this article. And, of course, to beat HIV, you have to follow the science!

Barbara Jungwirth is a freelance writer and translator based in New York. Follow Barbara on Twitter: @reliabletran.

Myles Helfand is the executive editor and general manager of TheBody.com and TheBodyPRO.com. Follow Myles on Twitter: @MylesatTheBody.

Image Credit: U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (Public domain), via Wikimedia Commons