This Week in HIV Research: Don't Assume PrEP Use Increases STI Rates

This Week in HIV Research: Don't Assume PrEP Use Increases STI Rates

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We've got a fascinating set of studies to share with you in this week's exploration of recently published HIV research. Most of this week's batch focuses on people with HIV under the age of 30, but with ramifications that may stretch well beyond that age group. Here's what we're looking at this time around:

  • Contrary to some earlier findings, a new study among young black men who have sex with men suggests no relationship between uptake of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and increased sexually transmitted infection (STI) incidence.
  • Assigning people an HIV risk score doesn't necessarily make them any more keen to begin PrEP.
  • Youth-tailored HIV services may be effective at keeping young folks living with HIV in care -- but that doesn't necessarily translate to higher viral suppression.
  • Younger people living with HIV appear to be highly interested in long-acting antiretrovirals -- and the less frequent the dose, the more they're into them.

Join us for a closer look at each of these findings. To beat HIV, you have to follow the science!

Barbara Jungwirth is a freelance writer and translator based in New York. Follow Barbara on Twitter: @reliabletran.

Myles Helfand is the executive editor and general manager of TheBody and TheBodyPRO. Follow Myles on Twitter: @MylesatTheBody.

Image Credit: Chad Baker via Thinkstock

We've got a fascinating set of studies to share with you in this week's exploration of recently published HIV research. Most of this week's batch focuses on people with HIV under the age of 30, but with ramifications that may stretch well beyond that age group. Here's what we're looking at this time around:

  • Contrary to some earlier findings, a new study among young black men who have sex with men suggests no relationship between uptake of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and increased sexually transmitted infection (STI) incidence.
  • Assigning people an HIV risk score doesn't necessarily make them any more keen to begin PrEP.
  • Youth-tailored HIV services may be effective at keeping young folks living with HIV in care -- but that doesn't necessarily translate to higher viral suppression.
  • Younger people living with HIV appear to be highly interested in long-acting antiretrovirals -- and the less frequent the dose, the more they're into them.

Join us for a closer look at each of these findings. To beat HIV, you have to follow the science!

Barbara Jungwirth is a freelance writer and translator based in New York. Follow Barbara on Twitter: @reliabletran.

Myles Helfand is the executive editor and general manager of TheBody and TheBodyPRO. Follow Myles on Twitter: @MylesatTheBody.

Image Credit: Chad Baker via Thinkstock