This Week in HIV Research: Damming the Cascade of Unmet Needs

This Week in HIV Research: Damming the Cascade of Unmet Needs

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As the calendar flips from 2018 to 2019, the HIV research train keeps chugging, and we continue to mark new milestones in our understanding of HIV clinical science. This week's selections of recently published HIV-related research in peer-reviewed journals include:

  • A strong association between unmet subsistence needs -- particularly transportation -- and clinical outcomes among people with HIV who are discharged from a hospital.
  • Evidence that mental illness, substance use, or unstable housing at HIV diagnosis need not be an obstacle to successful treatment initiation.
  • A report on the potential value of statewide, facility-level HIV care continuum data in improving access to care.
  • Findings that suggest even moderate levels of stimulant use don't eliminate the benefits of antiretroviral therapy in people living with HIV.

Join us for our first review in a new year of scientific progress. To beat HIV, you have to follow the science!

Barbara Jungwirth is a freelance writer and translator based in New York. Follow Barbara on Twitter: @reliabletran.

Myles Helfand is the executive editor and general manager of TheBody and TheBodyPRO. Follow Myles on Twitter: @MylesatTheBody.

Image Credit: Ralwel for iStock via Thinkstock

As the calendar flips from 2018 to 2019, the HIV research train keeps chugging, and we continue to mark new milestones in our understanding of HIV clinical science. This week's selections of recently published HIV-related research in peer-reviewed journals include:

  • A strong association between unmet subsistence needs -- particularly transportation -- and clinical outcomes among people with HIV who are discharged from a hospital.
  • Evidence that mental illness, substance use, or unstable housing at HIV diagnosis need not be an obstacle to successful treatment initiation.
  • A report on the potential value of statewide, facility-level HIV care continuum data in improving access to care.
  • Findings that suggest even moderate levels of stimulant use don't eliminate the benefits of antiretroviral therapy in people living with HIV.

Join us for our first review in a new year of scientific progress. To beat HIV, you have to follow the science!

Barbara Jungwirth is a freelance writer and translator based in New York. Follow Barbara on Twitter: @reliabletran.

Myles Helfand is the executive editor and general manager of TheBody and TheBodyPRO. Follow Myles on Twitter: @MylesatTheBody.

Image Credit: Ralwel for iStock via Thinkstock