The Future of Hepatitis C Treatment

The Future of Hepatitis C Treatment

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Hepatitis C History

Hepatitis C (HCV) is a global epidemic with different genotypes of the virus more prevalent in specific regions of the world, explained Jurgen K. Rockstroh, M.D., of University of Bonn, Germany, at the 21st AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa. HCV was discovered in 1989, with the first anti-HCV therapy approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) two years later and the first drug combination (interferon and ribavirin) to combat the virus approved in 1998.

Hepatitis C (HCV) is a global epidemic with different genotypes of the virus more prevalent in specific regions of the world, explained Jurgen K. Rockstroh, M.D., of University of Bonn, Germany, at the 21st AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa. HCV was discovered in 1989, with the first anti-HCV therapy approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) two years later and the first drug combination (interferon and ribavirin) to combat the virus approved in 1998.

These drugs work mainly against genotype 1, which is common in the Americas and Northern Europe. However, few drugs act against genotype 3, which is especially prevalent in South Asia, or other genotypes commonly found in low- and middle-income countries.

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