Should HIV Cure Research, Inspired by Advances in Fighting Cancer, Aim for Remission Not Eradication?

Should HIV Cure Research, Inspired by Advances in Fighting Cancer, Aim for Remission Not Eradication?

1 of 6
Next >

Learning From Oncology

Although HIV and cancer might seem to be two distinct diseases, they are both products of a malfunctioning immune system. While a true cure remains elusive for both diseases, HIV researchers are looking at new advances in immuno-oncology for clues on how to achieve durable HIV remission.

Although HIV and cancer might seem to be two distinct diseases, they are both products of a malfunctioning immune system. While a true cure remains elusive for both diseases, HIV researchers are looking at new advances in immuno-oncology for clues on how to achieve durable HIV remission.

"Much of the work we are doing should be informed and inspired by work in cancer," said Steven Deeks, M.D., professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, speaking at the New York State 2016 HIV Cure Symposium, organized by Mount Sinai's Institute for Advanced Medicine. Dr. Deeks told the audience that it's time to reframe our thinking about an HIV cure and to start focusing on the achievable goal of "HIV remission." Instead of finding and killing every single infected cell, the goal of HIV remission treatment is allowing patients to live years and even decades without taking any antiretroviral medication.

Credit: designer491 for iStock via Thinkstock.