Fighting HIV in the Trump Era: U.S. Advocates Speak Out

Fighting HIV in the Trump Era: U.S. Advocates Speak Out

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In 2016, much of the conversation among U.S. HIV advocates was about building momentum. A National HIV/AIDS Strategy was in place, anti-stigma and anti-discrimination efforts were moving forward, scientific advances supported pre-exposure prophylaxis [PrEP] and treatment as prevention, and clear backing came from the country's highest political office.

In 2016, much of the conversation among U.S. HIV advocates was about building momentum. A National HIV/AIDS Strategy was in place, anti-stigma and anti-discrimination efforts were moving forward, scientific advances supported pre-exposure prophylaxis [PrEP] and treatment as prevention, and clear backing came from the country's highest political office.

Then, a presidential election happened, and the landscape ahead suddenly looked very different for people engaged in the fight against HIV.

At the 2017 U.S. Conference on AIDS in Washington, D.C., in September, we asked HIV community leaders from around the country how their priorities have changed since the election of Donald J. Trump, what they see as the most important challenges to the fight against HIV under a Trump presidency and how they plan to overcome those challenges.

Interviews for this article were conducted by Charles Sanchez, JD Davids and Olivia G. Ford. Transcripts have been lightly edited for clarity.