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HIV/AIDS Newsroom: August 2007

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  • S. Africa Says Half Million on HIV Drugs, But Official Warns of Resistance Risk (August 31, 2007)
    On Thursday, a top health official said an estimated half million South Africans with HIV have received antiretrovirals (ARVs). Approximately 300,000 are obtaining ARVs through public hospitals and clinics, while it is likely another 200,000 are receiving them through the private sector, Thami Mseleku, Director-General of the Health Department, said at a press conference. About 5.4 million South Africans have HIV -- the highest caseload in the world. Each day, an estimated 900 South Africans die of the disease, and 1,000 become newly infected. Treatment Action Campaign, an AIDS activist group, said a lack of monitoring makes it impossible to know how many are on ARV treatment, and it said the new figures should be treated with caution. .
    In CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update, from CDC National Prevention Information Network
  • United Kingdom: A Tale of Three Cities: Persisting High HIV Prevalence, Risk Behavior and Undiagnosed Infection in Community Samples of Men Who Have Sex With Men (August 30, 2007)
    Julie P. Dodds et al investigated the HIV prevalence and risk behavior in a community sample of men who have sex with men (MSM) in the English cities of Brighton, Manchester, and London. They found similar high levels of risk activity in all three cities. They noted that,"despite widespread availability of antiretroviral treatment and national policy to promote HIV testing, many HIV infections remain undiagnosed." The study was published in the August 1, 2007 issue of Sexually Transmitted Infections.
    In CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update, from CDC National Prevention Information Network
  • Wisconsin: Democrats Blast GOP Plan to Cut Funds for Family Planning Clinics (August 30, 2007)
    At a news conference on Tuesday, several Assembly Democrats slammed a Republican proposal to eliminate state funding of privately owned family planning clinics. The plan, included in the budget approved by the Republican-controlled Assembly, will limit women's access to birth control, breast and cervical cancer screenings, and sexually transmitted disease treatment and testing, the lawmakers said. .
    In CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update, from CDC National Prevention Information Network
  • Self-Test Kits Used Improperly Among High-Risk Populations (August 30, 2007)
    Some HIV self-test kits are used improperly by high-risk groups, and such groups can interpret test results inaccurately, according to a study published recently in the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, Reuters Health reports. The researchers found that 85% of the participants did not perform all of the test steps correctly or were unable to perform the test at all. They also found that as a result, invalid test results occurred in 56% of the cases, according to Reuters Health.
    In Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, from Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation
  • Calif. Senate Approves Bill to Allow HIV-Positive Men to Have Sperm Washed for Fertility Treatments (August 30, 2007)
    The California Senate recently voted 35-1 to approve a bill (SB 443) that would allow HIV-positive men to have their sperm washed and used for fertility treatments, the MediaNews/Oakland Tribune reports.
    In Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, from Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation
  • Saudi Arabia to Require Mandatory HIV Testing for Couples Before Marriage (August 30, 2007)
    Saudi Arabia, starting next year, plans to require couples wishing to be married to be screened for HIV. Couples will be required to receive tests for both HIV and hepatitis at one of more than 20 centers to be established nationwide, said Khaled al-Zahrani, the Ministry of Health's assistant undersecretary for preventive medicine. About 11,000 HIV/AIDS cases were reported in the country between 1984, when the first case was recorded, and the end of 2005, according to a health ministry official.
    In Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, from Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation
  • University of Pittsburgh Gets $16 Million to Study HIV (August 28, 2007)
    The National Institutes of Health announced Monday it is awarding the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine a five-year, $16 million grant to establish the Pittsburgh Center for HIV Protein Interactions. The center will conduct research to discover what happens when HIV proteins interact with cellular components of host cells. Dr. Angela Gronenborn, chair of the school's department of structural biology, will head the new center. NIH also funds structural biology centers at the University of California-San Francisco and the University of Utah. "Efforts by Dr. Gronenborn and her colleagues to identify and image pivotal virus-host cell interaction could forge new avenues for drug discovery," said Dr. Ravi Basavappa, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences' program director for the new centers.
    In CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update, from CDC National Prevention Information Network
  • Botswana Reduces Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission Rate to Less Than 4%, Boston Globe Reports (August 27, 2007)
    Botswana this year has reduced its rate of mother-to-child (MTC) HIV transmission to less than 4%, the Boston Globe reports. According to some experts, the decrease is the result of policy changes and political support for programs aimed at preventing MTC transmission. About 500,000 infants worldwide contract HIV from their mothers annually, accounting for about 12% of new HIV cases in 2006, according to UNAIDS.
    In Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, from Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation
  • PLoS Medicine Examines Effectiveness of Performance-Based Funding to Fight HIV/AIDS, TB, Malaria (August 24, 2007)
    Daniel Low-Beer of the Judge Business School at Cambridge University and colleagues examined the effectiveness of performance-based funding to fight HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria in developing countries. The researchers examined performance-based funding allocated by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, which provides money based on demonstrated results and progress toward goals that are set during the initial grant agreement. The study found that 75% of country programs reached their goals and used funding to deliver HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria services. It also found that 21% of the country programs did not reach their goals but demonstrated the potential to increase treatment and prevention efforts and meet future goals.
    In Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, from Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation
  • Survey: Seniors Have Sex Into 70s, 80s (August 23, 2007)
    Many Americans remain sexually active well into old age, according to the results of a new study funded by the federal government. The report is based on two-hour, in-person, in-home interviews conducted with 3,005 men and women around the country. Among the study's findings: Sex with a partner in the previous year was reported by 73 percent of those ages 57-64; 53 percent of those ages 64-75; and 26 percent of those ages 75-85. One out of seven men reported using Viagra or other substances to enhance sex. Only a minority reported more than one partner, and very few had paid for sex. The report was published in the New England Journal of Medicine.
    In CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update, from CDC National Prevention Information Network

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