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TheBodyPRO.com Covers CROI 2017

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Really Rapid Review -- CROI 2017, Seattle

February 19, 2017

Paul E. Sax, M.D.

Paul E. Sax, M.D.

The Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) returned to Seattle this past week for its 24th meeting. It's the 4th time CROI has been held in Seattle, an excellent city for a meeting of this size, which includes "only" 4200 people. The convention center is pleasant and user-friendly -- big but not cavernous, actually encourages interactions with colleagues -- and there are numerous hotels and restaurants within walking distance, plus more Starbucks per square foot than any place on the planet.

From a content perspective, the big change for CROI 2017 was the return of numerous studies on antiretroviral therapy, studies involving both approved and investigational agents. The last several years, by contrast, had relative dominance of pre-exposure prophylaxis and hepatitis C studies. With PrEP, one had the sense at the meeting that we're now waiting for the next strategies (long-acting injectables, for example).

As for hepatitis C, well that's been all but solved (except for the implementation part). How do you improve on 97%-plus cured. Hooray!

On to the summary, a Really Rapid Review™ of the most interesting studies at the conference (at least from one perspective, ahem). Links are to the conference website (as usual excellent), abstract #'s are in brackets, and be sure to check out some of the oral presentations here. The list is roughly organized into epidemiology/prevention, treatment, cure, and opportunistic infections. Please tell me what I missed in the comments section.

And, because I was involved in a few of the studies listed below, for full disclosure I've inserted a special Puppy text emoticon to draw attention to that fact. ੯ੁૂ‧̀͡u (Make sure you click on them. Woof.)

If you're interested in watching webcasts of interesting plenary or symposium talks, I can strongly recommend Demetre Daskalakis on ending the HIV epidemic in NYC (he has more energy than the rest of the 4199 CROI attendees combined), Charlie Flexner on long-acting ART (he dispelled several "myths"), and Carl June on how cellular treatments of cancer might apply to the HIV cure effort.

One caveat to this last talk is that Dr. June neglected to mention that there's huge difference in acceptable risk between someone with refractory metastatic cancer versus stable HIV infection. So I'm mentioning it for him.

You're welcome.

See you at next year's CROI in Boston!



Paul E. Sax, M.D., is director of the HIV Program and Division of Infectious Diseases at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

Read the blog, HIV Care Today.

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This article was provided by Journal Watch. Journal Watch is a publication of the Massachusetts Medical Society.
 


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Please note: Knowledge about HIV changes rapidly. Note the date of this summary's publication, and before treating patients or employing any therapies described in these materials, verify all information independently. If you are a patient, please consult a doctor or other medical professional before acting on any of the information presented in this summary. For a complete listing of our most recent conference coverage, click here.

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