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TheBodyPRO.com covers CROI 2013

Way-Long-Acting Integrase Inhibitor for PrEP?: One Study Whose Impact Will Last Well Beyond CROI 2013

March 14, 2013

We just mentioned the opportunities of a well-tolerated, long-acting medication to address the challenges of PrEP. Last summer, we learned of the investigational integrase inhibitor S/GSK1265744 that, in a long-acting, nanoparticle formulation, has a plasma half-life after single intramuscular injection of 21 to 50 days. Detectable, potentially therapeutic drug levels were measured after 4 months with several intramuscular doses. (Did we say way-long-acting?)

We learned at CROI of the provocative results of S/GSK1265744 for the prevention of simian HIV (SHIV) infection following repeated rectal challenge in SHIV-uninfected rhesus macaques following a single intramuscular injection. In the placebo group, all eight monkeys -- compared to none of the eight treated monkeys -- became infected with SHIV. Importantly, the drug was safe and plasma concentrations of GSK744 in protected macaques are comparable to those achieved in humans, providing support for future studies.

Which other studies presented at CROI 2013 will have lasting impact long after memories of the conference itself have faded? Read more of Dr. Llibre and Dr. Young's top picks.


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This article was provided by TheBodyPRO.com. It is a part of the publication The 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2013).
 


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Please note: Knowledge about HIV changes rapidly. Note the date of this summary's publication, and before treating patients or employing any therapies described in these materials, verify all information independently. If you are a patient, please consult a doctor or other medical professional before acting on any of the information presented in this summary. For a complete listing of our most recent conference coverage, click here.

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