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HIV Care Today


Redefining Expanded Access for Patients With Multidrug-Resistant HIV
By Nelson Vergel, B.S.Ch.E., M.B.A.
March 21, 2013

In a host of meetings on treatment access and HIV research, we have repeatedly heard the following statements about multidrug-resistant HIV (MDR-HIV) patients:

"These patients no longer exist -- they're either dead or have responded to the latest ARVs."

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Really Rapid Review: CROI 2013, Atlanta
By Paul E. Sax, M.D.
March 10, 2013

As noted previously by Carlos del Rio in his nice summary, the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) turned 20 this year. It also made it's first-ever stop in Atlanta, home of many things that begin with "C" -- CDC (note that insiders rarely say, "the CDC"), CNN, Coca Cola, and Carlos himself.

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Exploring the Media Fascination With the Baby Cured of HIV
By Paul E. Sax, M.D.
March 5, 2013

As undoubtedly you've heard by now, there's another person cured of HIV out there -- this time, it's a baby born to an HIV-infected mother.

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Meth Makes an Ominous Comeback Among Gay Men
By David Fawcett, Ph.D., L.C.S.W.
March 3, 2013

She's back. Tina, that is. Crystal, crank, meth, ice, amp -- all slang for the same drug: methamphetamine. In the early part of the millennium, meth was pervasive both in rural America and in urban gay communities. Its use peaked around 2005 when, following a federal law limiting access to its primary precursor, pseudoephedrine, usage seemed to drop. In gay communities, men became aware of its hazards as they watched friends lose lovers, jobs, health, freedom and even their lives. Pursued by law enforcement, hardcore users went underground but never really went away. Now, because of the cycles of recreational drugs, a new generation, short memories, and the seductive power of this dopamine-releasing supermolecule, the drug appears to be making a comeback, at least in the gay community.

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An Adherence Intervention That Works -- But There's a Catch
By Paul E. Sax, M.D.
February 17, 2013

In a previous post, we reviewed the various flavors of medication non-adherence, and concluded with this tantalizing line:

Next up: "An Adherence Intervention that Actually Works -- But There's a Catch"
Well here it is, just published on-line in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Medication Adherence: The Final Frontier
By Paul E. Sax, M.D.
February 13, 2013

Treatment of HIV has become so amazingly effective that when it fails, it's no overstatement to say that it's usually because the patient is not taking the medications. There are all kinds of provider-related reasons for this -- inadequate patient education, prescribing and dispensing errors, failure to address language or education deficits -- but here I want to focus on the patient-related causes.

In other words, on non-adherence.

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Not by Ourselves: The Essential Role of Family and Community in Maintaining Health
By David Fawcett, Ph.D., L.C.S.W.
February 12, 2013

In the modern world it can be remarkably easy to discover where you are. A simple tap on the screen of a smart phone or consultation with a car's GPS device instantly reports our location on the planet with almost absurd precision. Such effortless ability to locate ourselves in time and space can shroud the complications of maintaining emotional bearings in the more ambiguous, upside-down world of living with HIV. Those who are newly diagnosed, as well as long-term survivors, are buffeted by the powerful forces unleashed by living with or around HIV, and frequently find it challenging to maneuver this emotional realm.

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Innovative HIV Gene Therapy Study Soon to Start Enrollment
By Nelson Vergel, B.S.Ch.E., M.B.A.
January 17, 2013

Calimmune, a small biotechnology company, has been given the go-ahead by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to start enrolling HIV-infected people in a first-of-its-kind gene therapy study that will modify two HIV attachment sites in CD4+ cells.

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More Evidence That Early HIV Treatment -- REALLY Early -- Is Beneficial
By Paul E. Sax, M.D.
January 16, 2013

Management of recently acquired HIV infection -- especially acute HIV, pre-seroconversion -- has long been controversial, with the risks and benefits of treatment versus observation debated now for nearly two decades.

(Yes, it's been that long since the publication of this controlled trial of zidovudine monotherapy. Amazing.)

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How Can "JAK Inhibitors" Help Salvage Patients and the Search for an HIV Cure?
By Nelson Vergel, B.S.Ch.E., M.B.A.
January 15, 2013

As part of my work as an HIV cure and salvage treatment activist, I am constantly searching for treatment options that could serve two purposes: help patients with multidrug resistance, and at the same time be used as an approach to cure HIV. Since my nonprofit, Program for Wellness Restoration (PoWeR), has a very small budget for me to attend conferences, I rely on the summaries that Jules Levin and his group at National AIDS Treatment Advocacy Project (NATAP) publish after he attends conferences. I am glad Jules can serve as eyes and ears for those of us who are unable to attend so many important scientific meetings.

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This article was provided by TheBodyPRO.com.
 

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