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HIV Care Today


To Breastfeed or Not to Breastfeed While Living With HIV? Data Needed!
By Barbara Jungwirth
July 18, 2018

After the United States' recent opposition to a World Health Organization (WHO) resolution promoting breastfeeding, U.S. president Donald Trump said that infant formula was needed especially for women in resource-poor situations. However, that's exactly when breastfeeding is safer than formula, Michele Barry, M.D., FACP, of the Stanford School of Medicine, argued in a New York Times article on this controversy.

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Lung Cancer Risk and Screening With HIV -- and an Intriguing New Treatment Opportunity
By Mark Mascolini
July 2, 2018

Highly regarded for his contributions to cancer research in people with HIV, Dr. Sigel is Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of General Internal Medicine and the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. With a focus on two non-AIDS-defining malignancies -- lung cancer and anal cancer -- Dr. Sigel has led numerous innovative studies on these conditions and others in people with HIV. His work addresses unique aspects of HIV-related malignancy, including risk, prevention, treatment, and prognosis. He cochairs the Cancer Core of the Veterans Aging Cohort Study, a large longitudinal comparison of HIV-positive and -negative veterans with equivalent access to care and a high lung cancer burden. With an MD and a Masters in Public Health from the University of North Carolina and a PhD from Mount Sinai, Dr. Sigel devotes time to the primary care of people with HIV infection and hepatitis C infection. His many speaking invitations include talks at Yale University, the University of Massachusetts, and the University of North Carolina.

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Today Is the Day: A Call to Action for Providers During LGBTQ Pride Month
By Jessica Halem, M.B.A.
June 12, 2018

By the looks of my Instagram feed and this month's events calendar, everything is going great for LGBTQ people. The bright colors and loud music are a good balm to ward off the extra stress we carry with us as sexual and gender minorities; lesbians; gay men; and bisexual, transgender, non-binary, and intersex people. What bad day couldn't be helped by a little glitter?

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Why the Dolutegravir Pregnancy Warning Is Important -- and What We Should Do Now
By Paul E. Sax, M.D.
May 23, 2018

Last week, in response to newly available surveillance data, multiple agencies issued a warning about the HIV integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (DTG) and pregnancy. The warnings cite an increased risk of neural tube defects in babies born to women who became pregnant while receiving the drug.

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Why Experienced HIV/ID Doctors Leave Clinical Practice
By Paul E. Sax, M.D.
May 16, 2018

Three of my good friends -- they're way more than just colleagues after all this time -- in the HIV/ID world have left clinical practice recently.

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The Patient as Partner
By Jennifer McPhee
May 2, 2018

The idea that a person should be an active participant, not just a recipient, of their own healthcare has deep roots. Feminists, people living with HIV and people with hemophilia have been making the case for decades: People should have control over their own bodies. We introduce you to one man who speaks from experience about the life-changing benefits of being a healthcare partner. Nine years ago, Vincent Dumez set out to transform the healthcare system so that it harnesses the skills and expertise of patients.

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Excessive Online Support Can Be Harmful to HIV Patients
By David Fawcett, Ph.D., LCSW
April 18, 2018

From the beginning of the internet era, both HIV-positive people and heath care providers alike have sought medical information online. Over the course of the HIV epidemic, web-based platforms have grown in numbers and sophistication. However, because anyone can post virtually anything on the internet, it is necessary to employ both caution and critical thinking when attempting to self-diagnose a medical condition or to evaluate health care information, including implausible cures.

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Case Management Improves Linkage to Care for People Living With HIV Post-Release From Prison or Jail, New Study Shows
By Barbara Jungwirth
March 28, 2018

People living with HIV who spent time in Connecticut correctional facilities and received transitional case management were more likely to be promptly linked to care after their release than those who did not receive such services, a study published in The Lancet found. The study found several factors that negatively impacted linkage to care when released from custody, including sentences less than 30 days, serving more than one year, conditional release, and reincarceration.

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Depression in People With HIV May Increase Missed Appointments, Detectable Viral Load, and Mortality, Says New Study
By David Fawcett, Ph.D., LCSW
March 16, 2018

Depression has long been recognized not only as a condition that increases risk for acquiring the HIV virus but also as a factor that dramatically impacts the quality of life of and health outcomes for persons living with HIV/AIDS. Researchers have fair agreement on the high occurrence of depression in HIV-positive patients (as high as 40%), but the long-term impact of co-occurring depression and HIV has received little attention. A new study examines the association between increased chronicity of depression in people living with HIV and health outcome indicators, such as HIV appointment attendance, treatment failure, and mortality. The findings reveal both the significant impact of depression and the need for more comprehensive assessment and treatment of depression among people with HIV at various stages in the care continuum.

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Long-Term Treated HIV No Defense Against Diabetes Risk
By Barbara Jungwirth
March 2, 2018

It has long been thought that the heightened risk of diabetes among people living with HIV was mostly due to early-generation antiretroviral drugs that raised glucose levels. But a longitudinal Australian study published in the Feb. 20, 2018, issue of AIDS found that, even in the modern treatment era, HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) developed diabetes at an extremely high rate.

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This article was provided by TheBodyPRO.
 

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